The nation is five months and more than 120,000 lives into its worst disease outbreak in a century and, short of a vaccine or cure, only a few effective tools remain for staving off new coronavirus infections.

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Amid nearly comprehensive national disarray, a glimmer of hope: Last week, the Senate passed a landmark bill establishing permanent funding to preserve America’s public lands and alleviate a huge maintenance backlog at national parks. The measure is popular, bipartisan and right on the merit…

Days after a white police officer killed a pleading black man by kneeling on his neck, a prominent American gave voice to the black community’s anguish: “Racism in America is like dust in the air. It seems invisible — even if you’re choking on it — until you let the sun in. Then you see it’s everywhere. As long as we keep shining that light, we have a chance of cleaning it wherever it lands.”

By rejecting President Trump’s attempt to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, the Supreme Court provided an unexpected lifeline to roughly 650,000 undocumented immigrants, known as Dreamers, who were facing the threat of deportation. Congress should seize the opportunity …

The fatal and thoroughly needless police shooting of Rayshard Brooks late Friday, June 12 in a Wendy’s parking in Atlanta makes it harder to counter the growing “Defund the Police” movement, which argues not for reform but for largely replacing armed law enforcement.

National Football League Commissioner Roger Goodell may have just been trying to score PR points with players and the public this month when he tweeted out a statement condemning systemic racism, acknowledging that there would be no NFL without Black players and encouraging players to “speak…

In the three decades since the beating of unarmed black motorist Rodney King — the first proof of unequal police treatment captured on video and blasted across the country — law enforcement departments have remained all too powerful, racially biased and virtually unchecked, despite repeated attempts at reform.

There are emerging glimmers that even some top Republican officials are growing weary of some of their president’s assaults on democracy.

George Floyd’s name is now known around the globe; his death has sparked protests from Berlin to Mexico City. The extraordinary cruelty of his killing has shocked the world. But his death has resonated so widely not because it was exceptional, but because it was not. Not exceptional in the U…

Ever since China announced plans to impose a sweeping new national-security law on Hong Kong, Western democracies have struggled to come up with an effective response. Such steps as ending the former British colony’s special trade privileges, as the U.S. has suggested, are likelier to hurt o…

On April 4 1968, Martin Luther King Jr phoned a local pastor with the title of his Sunday sermon: “Why America May Go to Hell.” The civil rights leader was shot dead before he could address the parishioners of Ebenezer Baptist church in Atlanta. Over the next few weeks the United States foun…

Declaring he was “your president of law and order,” President Trump on Monday said he was prepared to deploy U.S. troops to end the violence and vandalism that has accompanied a nationwide protest against police brutality.

A Minneapolis police officer, who was filmed kneeling on George Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes until the life left his body, has been fired, arrested and charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter. That is a step toward justice. Those who take a life should face a jury of their …

‘The reason that Black people are in the streets,” the acclaimed American writer James Baldwin said in 1968, “has to do with the lives they are forced to lead in this country. And they are forced to lead these lives by the indifference and the apathy and a certain kind of ignorance, a very w…

Minneapolis police arrived at the scene of an alleged theft on Monday, and there they failed the most basic tests of public service and humanity. At least one of the officers committed a horrifying act of abuse against an unarmed man as another stood by callously – and allowed the brutality …

An effective unemployment-insurance system plays an essential role in a healthy economy. It helps people get by when they lose jobs. It improves productivity by supporting workers while they find the best match for their skills. It mitigates recessions by maintaining consumers’ spending powe…

We believe in the Constitution and limited government.

A big focus for colleges and universities during the coronavirus pandemic shutdown has been on how students and professors are adjusting to the shift from campus life to online education. A newer focus is on seniors losing out on traditional graduation ceremonies and facing an uncertain future.

Listeners could be forgiven for a sense of deja vu: “It’s going to go. It’s going to leave. It’s going to be gone,” Donald Trump pronounced of coronavirus on Wednesday.

More than a fifth of the 55,000 known covid-19 deaths in the United States have occurred at nursing homes and other elder-care facilities. Federal and state governments have largely turned a blind eye, often making no effort to test residents or staffs and leaving relatives, surrounding comm…

Hoosiers from across state, political spectrum deserve task force representation

The small groups of people who have gathered, and continue to gather, to protest coronavirus restrictions in this state and many others are right about one big thing: The damage being done by the stay-at-home orders is enormous.

Last month, US Postal Service workers delivered “President Trump’s Coronavirus Guidelines for America” to households across the country. But Trump, of course, has no interest in helping the agency he relied on to get out his message and feels no patriotic duty to support postal workers who a…

A global pandemic demands a global response. The only international body that can provide that response is the World Health Organization. It is the WHO’s job to track the spread of coronavirus, to share information and advice about best practice, and to help co-ordinate the international res…

In normal times, trying to persuade everyone to stand up and be counted in the once-in-a-decade census presents a challenge.

Are we surprised that the wealthy residents of exclusive Fisher Island have purchased their own coronavirus test kits from another private institution to keep themselves and their employees safe?

In some places in the United States and other developed countries hit hard by Covid-19, the question is when might it become possible to start getting back to work. For much of the rest of the world, the nightmare is yet to start. And part of the horror is that many poorer countries won’t ha…

When the World Health Organization (WHO) announced in February that the disease caused by the new coronavirus would be called COVID‑19, the name was quickly adopted by organizations involved in communicating public-health information. As well as naming the illness, the WHO was implicitly sen…

As we mourn the loss of thousands to the coronavirus, we must also find ways to celebrate these lives taken too soon.

Millions of Americans, sheltering in their homes from the coronavirus, have turned to communications platforms like Zoom, Google Hangouts and Facebook Messenger in order to work or stay connected to friends and family. Free and easy to use, the services are gobbling up record numbers of new users.

During this pandemic, it’s important to think about what we can do to protect the most vulnerable in our community.

Weeks after a mysterious and uncommonly lethal virus began sweeping through the world, Los Angeles’ mayor declared a state of emergency. Though the pandemic had yet to affect the city in large numbers – only a few confirmed cases had been identified in Southern California – city and health o…

America came face to face with the festering problem of digital inequality when most of the country responded to the coronavirus pandemic by shutting elementary and high schools that serve more than 50 million children.

Economies have gone on to a war footing: manufacturers are retooling factories to supply the needs of governments, workers are being mobilised and reallocated to areas of shortages. The financial sector must, likewise, adjust to the new reality. Banks will bear a large part of the burden tha…

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